Professional Staff Details

Nadia Bethley, Ph.D., University of Mississippi

Diversity Coordinator, Licensed Psychologist

Theoretical Orientation:

My theoretical orientation is largely influenced by my heavily cognitive-behavioral training, particularly in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. As I continue to grow, I also have begun integrating other theoretical orientations into my practice such as interpersonal therapy and solution focused therapy. I also incorporate principles of multicultural therapy into my practice. I believe that the therapeutic relationship can be a powerful source of change and that without a safe, strong relationship, progress is often impeded. Within therapy, I primarily focus on what matters to my client (i.e. their values) and what may be getting in the way of living in accordance with their values. Using a here-and-now approach, we work together to explore and develop strategies to help clients get unstuck.

Client Areas:

I have been trained as a generalist, and as such have a wide range of client concerns. I am particularly interested in issues pertaining to identity, social justice, and diversity.

Supervision Style:

I am still fairly new to supervision, so I feel my supervision style is continuing to evolve. I primarily work from a developmental perspective, and try meet supervisees where they are and challenge them to continue to grow. I also explore identity and culture and how these influence ourselves as clinicians as well as how it influences the students we work with. I believe that supervision works best when there is a safe, collaborative environment where a supervisee can be open and willing to try new things, and as such, I try to model this behavior and be open and forthcoming with supervisees. Finally, I strongly believe in helping to build a clinician’s own sense of clinical judgment, style, and theoretical orientation.

Bio:

I spend most of my time not on campus following the lead of my daughter, whether it be a baking experiment, an impromptu dance party, or a crafting adventure. We like to spend time playing outdoors and spent a lot of time with our cats and dog. Whenever I manage to steal a moment for myself, I love reading any and all books and can likely be found with my nose stuck somewhere in one.

 

Kimberly Conde, Psy.D., Wright State University

Licensed Psychologist

Theoretical Orientation:

Although I believe that flexibility and creativity are crucial to the provision of good therapy, I conceptualize primarily through a Person Centered Therapy model. I believe that psychological difficulties often arise in the context of early relationships with caregivers and significant others. In these relationships, individuals may have not received the unconditional positive regard that fosters an innate tendency toward growth and fulfillment. I believe that a safe therapy relationship, characterized by genuine, positive regard, can guide these individuals to develop a healthy self-regard and increase awareness of previously denied aspects of self. In other words, healing comes through the therapy relationship. I also incorporate Multicultural Theory into my therapy work due to a belief that cultural biases and societal norms can sometimes impede well-being and authentic living. As such, exploration of cultural context and the intersectionality of cultural variables is imperative to my understanding of a client’s experience and presenting concerns.

Clinical Areas:

I have gained knowledge and skills through my experience while training and working in university counseling center and community mental health settings. As a result, I have worked with individuals presenting with a wide range of concerns and consider myself a generalist. I have sought specific training related to gender and especially enjoy working with men and issues related to masculinity. Another area of interest is in working with survivors of domestic violence, such as emotional and physical abuse, stalking, and other concerns related to power and control dynamics in relationships. I also enjoy working with clients who have an interest in incorporating their spiritual and religious beliefs into a plan for healing, when appropriate.

Supervision Style:

Similar to my therapy style, my conceptualization of supervision is rooted in Carl Rogers’ theory of an “actualizing tendency.” I believe that a supervisee is most likely to grow while being supported in a relationship with accurate empathy, genuine interaction, and positive regard. I seek to provide corrective feedback in a supportive way that builds upon a supervisee’s resources and resilience. Further, I believe that social, cultural, and relational factors all play a role in supervisee growth and readily invite supervisees to bring these dynamics to the safe context of the supervisory relationship.

Bio:

In my free time, I enjoy spending time with my children and other loved ones! I love the water, so swimming, boating, or simply laying by the water are valued activities. In general, I enjoy being active and especially enjoy trying things for the first time. Finally, I like to spend time developing my spiritual identity through reading, fellowship, and other activities that enable my personal growth in this area.

 

Kim Daniels, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Licensed Psychologist

Theoretical Orientation:

I integrate a number of approaches into my theoretical orientation, but my theoretical “home” is in psychodynamic theory. Most of my training was in interpersonal theories and object relations, and I still draw heavily upon those theories. I believe we develop both our sense of self and our interpersonal templates in the context of relationships. As you might imagine, I believe our early experiences of attachment in our family of origin are pivotal in our development; however, I also believe our relationships with peers and members of our wider community shape who we become and how we respond to the stresses encountered over the lifespan. When I am working with clients, I try to understand them and their presenting concerns within a larger sociocultural context. I am very interested in identifying client strengths and coping strategies and building upon those strengths as we work together in a collaborative framework. In addition to psychodynamic theory, I have also been trained in Internal Family Systems theory and find it to be particularly helpful in working with clients who are struggling with the aftereffects of trauma and eating disorders.

Client Areas:

I consider myself to be a generalist. I am comfortable working with a wide range of presenting concerns, but have particular interest and expertise in working with individuals struggling with body image issues, eating disorders and the aftereffects of trauma.

Supervision Style:

I use a developmental approach to supervision insofar as I try to meet my supervisee where he or she is and mutually develop specific training goals for our work together. Just as I focus in therapy on developing a strong therapeutic relationship, I believe it is essential to develop a strong collaborative supervisory relationship. Learning requires one to take risks, to stretch, and to be self-reflective, yet learning cannot occur if one does not feel safe. I enjoy spending time in supervision identifying and focusing upon my supervisee’s strengths as well as challenging her or him to grow. I am continually growing as a therapist and supervisor, and one of the exciting things about providing clinical supervision is that I get to learn from every new supervisee. I expect to share my experiences and clinical wisdom with supervisees as well as my mistakes. I enjoy using tape review as a learning tool, regardless of my supervisees’ experience level. With fairly novice trainees, tape review can be invaluable for developing strong basic skills, and with more advanced trainees, tape review can provide an excellent window into potential countertransference and process issues. I focus a lot in therapy on interpersonal process and bring this focus into supervision as well.

Bio:

I keep very busy outside of work spending time with my three boys, two horses, dog and cat. My happiest times are spent in the outdoors hiking, horseback riding, swimming and simply enjoying nature. I also love to read fiction and memoirs and enjoy writing as well.

 

Christine Even, Ph.D., University of North Dakota

Clinical Logistics Coordinator

Theoretical Orientation:

Though my theoretical orientation continues to evolve, I primarily conceptualize from a combination of psychodynamic (object relations) and interpersonal theories and practice within a Time Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy (TLDP) model. I believe that our early environments and relationships (often our families of origin) impact the way we relate to ourselves and others. I believe that corrective relationships, primarily first through the therapeutic relationship, and then with significant others in one’s life can alter destructive and maladaptive patterns. I use interpersonal interventions in order to process these relational interactions and promote healing. I also conceptualize within a multicultural framework as I truly believe that it is essential to consider cultural issues when conceptualizing any client. I integrate interventions from a variety of theories into my work with clients based on their individual needs, presenting issues, and cultural backgrounds.

Client Areas:

I was trained as a generalist and have worked in both community mental health as well as the university counseling center setting. I am comfortable working with a wide variety of client issues ranging from developmental issues (e.g., adjustment, identity development, etc.) to more severe psychopathology. My areas of special interest and expertise include career counseling, eating disorders, women’s issues, and trauma recovery, with a particular interest in working with individuals with a complex trauma background. I have also developed a passion for group therapy. I enjoy general process groups, graduate/non-traditional student groups, and women’s trauma and recovery groups.

Supervision Style

Providing supervision and training is one of the things that pulled me toward college counseling center work and is one of my favorite aspects of my job. I approach supervision much like I approach therapy with my clients in that I work within a developmental model and attempt to be flexible and meet my supervisees wherever they are in terms of their training and developmental needs. I approach supervision from Bernard’s Discrimination Model in that I work to balance my role as supervisor, therapist, and consultant as developmentally appropriate. I also acknowledge that supervision is not only a time for growing as a professional, but is also an opportune time for individual growth and integrating the personal and professional identity. I look forward to supporting interns through their many endeavors, including completing the dissertation, exploring professional interests, job search, professional identity development, further developing therapy skills, and balancing one’s personal and professional life. I work in supervision to provide a relaxed and supportive environment that is conducive to doing this. I also believe that challenge is a necessary component of supervision and hope that through challenge, my supervisees can come to a better understanding of themselves as well as their work with their clients. I also value differing perspectives and enjoy working with supervisees with different theoretical orientations as I always have room to grow and evolve myself.

Bio:

On a more personal note, there is no place I would rather be than on the water with my family and friends. I greatly enjoy camping, fishing, kayaking, boating, and playing in the water with my two wonderful children. When we aren’t on the water we are cheering on the Minnesota Twins and Vikings. Yes, even during the bad years. I also enjoy cooking and consider myself quite the chef. I love participating in our annual soup competition, bake off, and multicultural potluck.

 

Christy Hutton, Ph.D., University of Missouri

Assistant Director for Outreach and Prevention

Theoretical Orientation:

My theoretical orientation continues to grow and expand with new learning and experience. A number of theories including, Cognitive, Behavioral, Humanistic, and Solution Focused theories guide my practice. I see the therapist’s role much the way I see a family physician; providing brief interventions when the need arises rather than long term therapy. Using a strengths-based approach to identify what a person already does well, I help them build from that foundation. I believe that a person’s experience of emotional pain is informed by both their genetic makeup and the lessons they learn about emotions. A person’s emotional suffering can be compounded when they have few outlets for expression or when they learn ineffective strategies for managing emotional pain. Learning to experience emotional pain as it is rather than how I fear it may be can decrease suffering. I strive to create a safe and collaborative relationship through mindful listening, non-judgment, and acceptance where the client has the opportunity to feel heard and understood. Additionally, I believe that teaching practical strategies for managing emotions helps empower the individual and provides skills they can carry with them far beyond the therapy experience.

Client Areas:

Much of my career focused on working with individuals diagnosed with a severe and persistent mental illness (affective, anxiety, psychotic and axis II disorders). I see myself as a generalist and enjoy working with individuals with a wide variety of presenting concerns including adjustment, relationship issues, stress management, chronic pain, spirituality, and sexuality. I particularly enjoy working with anxiety and impulse control disorders. My clinical specialty is in Dialectical Behavior Therapy; helping individuals learn to manage emotional distress, resist acting on impulsive urges, and reducing suicidal ideation and behaviors. I also have significant training and experience with Mindfulness Based Interventions, which I incorporate into much of my work.
I love seeing the confidence and peace that often comes with learning to experience emotions without becoming overwhelmed by them. Teaching skills in a group or workshop format is one of my favorite activities, particularly those based on CBT, DBT, and Mindfulness practices.

Additionally, I have a strong interest in working with LGBTQ individuals and participating in social action in the community. One of the highlights of the past several years was being part of a team that received the Catalyst Award for advocacy work in the LGBTQ community.

Supervision Style:

One aspect of my work at the Counseling Center that I enjoy the most is training and supervision. I approach supervision much like the rest of my clinical work in that I try to create a safe and collaborative relationship. Each supervisee brings strengths and skills to the experience. I encourage supervisees to use their strengths as a foundation for taking risks and trying new interventions. I expect interns to present a level of professionalism around the basics (e.g., timely documentation, punctuality), freeing up supervision time to focus on enhancing thinking, conceptualization and strategies. As part of a collaborative team, I encourage honest feedback and discussion of the supervisory relationship. I particularly enjoy working with supervisees who conceptualize clients in ways that are different from my own, providing the opportunity for both parties to challenge and expand their own thinking. I strive to provide a nurturing and supportive environment that encourages supervisees to challenge themselves professionally and personally during the internship year. I enjoy the variety of professional development opportunities that arise during internship and welcome discussions and opportunities to support intern’s endeavors in completing dissertation, exploring professional interests and activities, job search, professional identity development, and balancing personal and professional life.

Bio:

When I’m not at the Counseling Center I actively enjoy spending time with my partner and three kids. We love escaping to the mountains whenever possible, walking on area trails, visiting my in-laws farm, and kayaking. Spending time with our larger families is an integral part of our family life. We also spend a fair amount of time supporting our kids’ tai kwon do, art, music, and social activities. I am active with a local children’s theater program where I manage the box office and front of the house for several shows per year. An avid reader, I enjoy a broad range of fiction. During late summer and fall you will likely find me in my kitchen canning the bounty of our garden and those of several local farmers. When the temperature drops I’m more likely to be curled up knitting or watching a movie. Another highlight for me is teaching a comprehensive sexuality class at my church (yes really) in the spring. It is great fun to watch teenagers navigate interesting and often precarious waters associated with their own emerging identities. Regardless of season or activity my faithful dog Max is usually close by and our cat’s underfoot.

 

Jenny Lybeck-Brown, Ph.D, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Associate Director/Training Director

Theoretical Orientation:

I conceptualize clients using a combination of psychodynamic (object relations) and interpersonal theories. I believe that the way that people currently relate to themselves and others is largely impacted by their early environments, often through relationships in their families of origin. In the same way that relationships can often be destructive, I believe that safe, corrective relationships with a therapist and eventually with significant others gives clients an opportunity to relearn things about themselves and the world. I use interpersonal interventions in order to process these relational interactions and promote healing. I am also guided by a strong multicultural framework and believe that it is essential to consider issues of culture, oppression, etc. when thinking about any client. Cultural factors are a large part of who we are as individuals and impact everything from clients’ presenting problems to their coping strategies. Although I primarily conceptualize from a psychodynamic/interpersonal perspective, I integrate interventions from a variety of theories into my work with clients based on their level of readiness for therapy, presenting issues, and cultural backgrounds. My interest in being flexible in my interventions has led me to have an interest in alternative or creative interventions, such as art therapy, imagery work, EMDR, etc.

Clinical Areas:

I was trained as a generalist, and I am comfortable working with a wide variety of client issues ranging from normal developmental issues (e.g., adjustment, identity development, etc.) to more severe psychopathology. My areas of special interest and expertise include eating disorders, women’s issues, and trauma recovery, with particular interest in working with sexual assault and abuse survivors. I am also interested in issues of vicarious trauma of therapists and therapists in training who work with trauma survivors. I have received quite a bit of training in career counseling, and this is something that I enjoy when I have the opportunity to work with a client on these issues. I also like working in a group modality, particularly in groups with an interpersonal process focus.

Supervision Style:

My supervision style is developmental in that I conceptualize each supervisee in terms of where she or he is in terms of therapist development and try to tailor my style and “interventions” to complement this level of development. Similar to clinical work, I believe that developing a strong working relationship based on safety and trust is the foundation of work in supervision. I tend to be fairly process oriented in supervision and find it important to focus on the interactions between the supervisee and his or her clients, as well as looking at the relationship between myself and the supervisee. This work frequently highlights the supervisee’s reactions to clients and own issues that impact clinical work. I think that a good deal of support and encouragement is important for all trainees, and I emphasize the strengths that each therapist brings (and encourage trainees to recognize their own strengths). I also believe that it is important to receive challenge in supervision, and I try to provide direct, constructive feedback throughout the course of supervision (I don’t like evaluations to be a surprise). I don’t like to “micromanage” my supervisees, and I appreciate when supervisees attend carefully to the details of their work (e.g., writing careful, timely notes) so that supervision time can be spent having in depth discussions of clinical work. I am also open to discussing professional issues in supervision, such as dissertation progress, balancing work and family, and job search, as these are important aspects of one’s development as a professional and an overall balanced individual. As training director, I do not provide individual supervision to the interns, though they do get to know me as a supervisor through the supervision of supervision seminar.

Bio:

On a personal level, my “other” full-time job is being a mom to two wonderful children. Our family enjoys staying active with outdoor activities of all types, playing board games (stand back, I’m pretty competitive!), attending theater events, and reading together. We also have a very ornery Goldendoodle aptly named Penelope Pickle who takes me for frequent walks and helps me easily meet my Fitbit goals. Though I don’t have a lot of “me time,” I am an avid fiction reader and am always looking for new book suggestions. I feel most at peace when I am in the sun and near the ocean and hope to live a bit nearer to a coast when I retire someday.

 

Anne Meyer, Ph.D. Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Associate Director/Clinical Director

Theoretical Orientation:

Although I feel one’s theoretical orientation continues to be refined as we continue to grow as clinicians, I actively integrate interpersonal, CBT, and emotion-focused therapy, while examining the world from a feminist/multicultural lens. I believe that individuals are impacted by their relationships and cultural context, and while my emphasis frequently examines the impact of current relationships and experiences one has, it is often important to consider early attachment and dynamics of their family of origin in this process. I highly value the use of self to influence client change by focusing on the “here and now” process that occurs in the therapeutic relationship. Using schema work, I help clients consider their understanding of relationships and the attributions they make about events in their lives. I believe in examining the sociocultural factors impacting clients, being very genuine in my work including use of humor, being flexible with my interventions to meet clients where they are, and actively working to empower clients to increase change.

Clinical Areas:

I have been trained in a generalist tradition and have worked in many settings prior to my tenure at MU. However, my true passion lies in serving the college student population and it is where I have found I feel most at home. I am excited by the unique developmental challenges/growth areas that are inherent to our clients. I have specialized in working with trauma survivors, particularly childhood sexual abuse and survivors of interpersonal violence or sexual assault. It is my work with these clients that I probably find most rewarding. I also have significant experience working with clients experiencing suicidal ideation and Cluster B diagnoses or traits.

Supervision Style:

Being able to provide training also drew me to work in a university counseling center setting. I love helping supervisees grow – clinically, professional, and personally. Not surprisingly, my supervisory style in many ways mirrors my theoretical orientation. I strive to meet my supervisees where they are developmentally but also value interns as “soon to be colleagues.” I enjoy supervisees who are willing to take risks and be open to the growth that occurs during internship year, but I recognize this cannot occur without a sense of safety. I actively work to develop trust within supervision so my supervisees feel they can “spread their wings” and still feel safe. This includes trusting our relationship with my goal being that interns feel comfortable enough to challenge me and openly process our relationship when needed. I find it important to highlight the strengths that interns bring to their work yet also examine the areas they can grow. A common growth area I focus on with interns includes being able to articulate their theoretical orientation and increase the purposefulness of their interventions with clients.

Bio:

If you like sarcasm and humor, please come by my office any time! I really enjoy my down time, whether it’s spending time with family, friends, or my playful pair of cats. I’m always up for learning a new recipe and enjoy traveling especially when I can experience different cultures.

 

Shraddha Niphadkar, Ph.D, University of Florida

Psychological Resident

Theoretical Orientation:

I identify as an integrative therapist who primarily conducts therapy through an integration of relational-cultural and mindfulness approaches. These approaches fit very well with my cultural background (I am an international therapist from India) and give me the freedom to take into account the various multicultural and social justice issues that could be impacting the therapeutic relationship. I believe that the therapeutic relationship is a microcosm of the way that the client interacts with the world. Paying attention to therapeutic process, in a mindful way, makes me be aware of what the client is expressing, including picking up on the subtleties in both verbal and non-verbal communication. It also helps me tune in to my own feelings, thoughts, and reactions in the present moment, which in turn helps me in being empathic and genuine with clients. This makes the therapeutic relationship a safe space where clients can express their vulnerabilities without feeling judged. It also allows us to acknowledge the impact of cultural differences on the relationship, which in turn gives us the opportunity to address and work with them. Ultimately, my goal is to empower clients and help them learn how to advocate for themselves and find their voice in the outside world.

Clinical Areas:

My training has been primarily as a generalist and I have worked with late adolescent and adult clients on a wide variety of issues including developmental issues (e.g. adjustment to college, acculturation difficulties, identity development, etc), substance use disorders, and other more severe psychopathology. I have received training in a variety of settings including university counseling centers, community mental health centers, and hospitals. My areas of special interest and expertise include working with international students, LGBTQ+ population, ethnic minorities, and sexual assault and domestic violence survivors in both individual and group counseling formats. I am also very passionate about providing outreach and consultation on critical mental health issues, and to underserved populations (e.g. acculturation and immigration related issues for international students, suicide prevention, intimate partner violence, etc.).

Supervision Style:

I love working with trainees and it is one of the main reasons I chose a career as a university counseling center psychologist! I tend to tailor my supervision according to the developmental needs of my supervisee. I aim at creating a safe space where my supervisees can openly talk about both their difficulties and strengths with clients without a fear of judgement. I also encourage supervisees to share major developments in their personal life with me (e.g. loss of a relationship, graduate school related stress, etc.). I do this because I believe that it is impossible for therapists to stay completely neutral in therapy and often our personal lives consciously or unconsciously impact our work with clients. I strive to support my supervisees in both their personal and professional challenges while also encouraging them to recognize their strengths and develop trust in their competencies as a clinician. I strive to provide direct, timely, and constructive feedback based on watching tape, reading my supervisees’ clinical documentation, and our discussions in supervision so that nothing comes as a major surprise/shock during evaluations. Additionally, similar to the way I do therapy, I am very mindful of multicultural issues. I encourage my supervisees to think about the various diversity factors that could be impacting their clients’ issues, as well as their relationship with their clients, within the theoretical framework that they like to operate from. Similarly, I pay attention to differences in cultural backgrounds between me and my supervisees and how that could be impacting our work together.

Bio:

Outside of the counseling center, I enjoy spending time with my partner and my dog, Viru. We like exploring the outdoors through hiking, water activities like canoeing and kayaking, and camping. We also enjoy entertaining our friends at home and often have them over on weekends for dinner and board game nights. My daily self-care plan includes cooking healthy meals for my partner and me and reading a fiction novel. I especially love to read suspense thrillers and novels with feminist and multicultural themes to them. I hope to have my own herb and vegetable garden someday.

 

Renee Powers-Scott, M.S.Ed., LPC

Referral Coordinator

Theoretical Orientation:

I would describe my theoretical orientation as integrative, with the main three being interpersonal, existential, and cognitive. These are done through the lens of spirituality when it applies, and multiculturalism. I believe everyone is born with a purpose and sometimes relationships, self talk, and societal influences impact the way a person perceives her or himself. Unknowingly, these may hinder achievement of their goals. Increasing one’s awareness of these issues is the first step in reaching ones goals. In order to gain an understanding of clients, it is important to comprehend what they find meaningful. This may be accomplished through the exploration of relationships, family, significant influences, past successes and failures, hopes, and coping strategies. I strive to create safety, acceptance, empathy, respect, and genuineness in the therapeutic relationship. I believe healthy relationships are fundamental in creating change and fostering growth.

Clinical Areas:

Due to having multiple years experience in a community setting, I am comfortable working with a wide variety of presenting concerns. I have extensive experience working with addictions and grief and loss. Additional areas of interest include identity development, women’s issues, transitions/developmental stages, and interpersonal neurobiology. I find it rewarding to see my clients make choices that facilitate in their quest for a better self. I sometimes offer bibliotherapy and other homework to supplement the learning outside of the office. I am interested in creative therapies that allow for nonverbal expression. Additionally, I serve as the referral coordinator here at the counseling center and assist clients with case management needs.

Supervision Style:

I believe supervision is the process of assisting the supervisee in refining their personal style. I believe the supervisory relationship should be a cooperative alliance. I work intently to provide an atmosphere of safety so the supervisee feels free to explore strengths and areas of concern. I help trainees become more aware of what they think about their clients, how they are affected by their clients, and how they believe they affect their clients. It is important to help the supervisee have increased awareness about this as it influences the therapeutic relationship.

Bio:

I enjoy spending time with family, friends, and my cat Zoe. I love to read, and cook whole foods and bake, and eat it of course! I routinely walk and do yoga. I’m still searching for how to gain the benefits from exercise without actually doing it. I enjoy being outdoors and watching nature. And when I’m not out shopping, I’m pretty much against materialism.

 

B. Lynne Reeder, Ph.D., University of Missouri

Director

Details coming soon!

 

Kerri Schafer, Ph.D., University of Nevada-Las Vegas

Outreach Events Coordinator

Details coming soon!

 

Jessica L. Semler, Ph.D., University of North Dakota

Licensed Psychologist

Theoretical Orientation:

I am most certainly an Integrative therapist at the core, and I believe that our theoretical orientations are ever-evolving as we grow and change throughout our careers. I pull from specific theories and schools based on the needs of my clients as well as the mixture of personality characteristics and personal histories in the therapy room. Above all, I believe that the therapeutic relationship is the key to growth and development and that in a trusting, open environment clients can be vulnerable, can honestly hear feedback, and can receive support. Additionally, I believe that immediacy and authenticity in therapeutic relationships are necessary for trust and bonds to form. The cultural and individual differences present between the client and therapist play significant roles in the development and success of the therapeutic relationship and should be explored. I believe that people grow through the identification of their personal strengths which help them to increase their confidence, self-efficacy, and self-awareness/insight. I further believe that our past experiences influence our current circumstances and that family of origin exploration/work can be essential to promote growth and forward movement. Client-centered theory and interpersonal theory form the basis of how I conceptualize my clients. Additionally, I tend to draw from the following theories/interventions to best fit the needs of my clients: strength-based, solution-focused, emotion-focused, cognitive-behavioral, systems, feminist, cultural-relational, and motivational interviewing.

Clinical Areas:

I consider myself to be a generalist and have worked in a variety of clinical settings (i.e., counseling centers, military base, intensive in-home family therapy, intimate partner violence offender groups) that have shaped how I work with college students. My experiences in these settings have helped me to deepen my understanding of students’ plethora of experiences that they encounter in their lives outside of college and how these experiences are currently impacting them. I feel honored to work with college students in therapy as this is often a transitional time in peoples’ lives and is a vital time for life-defining growth and development. I thoroughly enjoy working with couples and have recently developed a great love for group therapy as I have seen the power of peer process, support, and encouragement in student therapy groups. I feel that at many times, group can be the preferred treatment. Some of the presenting issues that I enjoy working with include: identity issues, women’s issues, relationship concerns, interpersonal violence issues, eating disorders/body image concerns, men with aggression issues, students that are nontraditional age, and family of origin concerns. I also have specific training and passion for working with transgender-identified students and enjoy the opportunity to support and empower these individuals.

Supervision Style:

Providing supervision and training to students is one of the most rewarding things I get to do as a psychologist! My supervision style is very similar to the approach I take with clients and starts with a safe, trusting environment where supervisees can be vulnerable and open to explore themselves in relation to their work with clients. I work primarily from a developmental approach in which I meet the supervisee where they are in their level of training and development. I provide support, encouragement, and challenges for trainees to grow and develop into confident, competent therapists. I find that a supervision setting where the trainee is challenged to process themselves produces a deeper understanding of their therapeutic work and leads to better outcomes for clients. Examining how supervisees’ characteristics, history, and identity affect their relationships and work with clients is essential for them to grow as a clinician and is why a great deal of my supervision is process-oriented. I like to provide a relaxed, supportive environment for my supervisees and spend a great deal of time identifying supervisee strengths. I believe that through recognizing current strengths, a supervisee can feel confident to stretch themselves to grow in supervision and feel motivated to challenge themselves as well. Additionally, much like my work with clients, I feel that the supervision relationship is a two-way street in which I expect to learn and grow with each supervisee. I strive to provide an environment in which open dialogue and exchange of ideas is the norm.

Bio:

I truly feel blessed to have found a career that I am passionate about AND I love my personal life as well! I am a proponent of balance in life and work and strive to be a model for trainees that emphasizes having a strong, healthy life outside of work. Relationships are the most important aspect of my personal life and I love to spend time with my husband and our two dogs, Opie and Zophia, as well as nurturing my relationships with friends and family who live all across the country. I thoroughly enjoy riding my Harley, training for half-marathons, reading memoirs (and the Hunger Games series!), watching movies (and reality shows!), camping, rooting on the Vikings and Mizzou football teams, and trying new, exotic foods. Traveling is my truest passion as I love to explore new cultures and learn about new places. I work hard AND I play hard!

 

Chris Smith, Ph.D., Indiana State University

Graduate Assistant Coordinator

Theoretical Orientation:

My theoretical orientation is predominantly humanistic and in its present configuration incorporates client-centered and existential concepts to help facilitate an understanding of clinical issues. Within the framework of these theories, I incorporate cognitive behavioral approaches to facilitate understanding and growth. My approach is very holistic and I strive to recognize and understand the developmental and socio-cultural factors that influence the individual’s view of self and their sense of themselves in the world. In helping individuals understand the socio-cultural factors that influence them I strive to empower them to make changes that they view as meaningful and helpful.

Clinical Areas:

I have worked in a variety of different clinical settings and consider myself to be a generalist in practice. Due to this I am comfortable working with a variety of concerns and developmental issues that range from common concerns to more severe psychopathology. My areas of special interest and expertise include multicultural and diversity issues and concerns, Men’s issues, issues faced by first generation college students, and social class concerns. I have also received significant training and clinical experience working with GLBTQA individuals. I am also deeply committed to group therapy and feel that group can provide very important learning and growth experiences for clients while also providing them with a great place to practice new skills.

Supervision Style:

I view supervision as an important, valuable, and rewarding part of my work as a psychologist. I approach supervision from a developmental perspective, and my supervision style incorporates the Discrimination model of supervision as outlined by Bernard and Goodyear (1992) with aspects from my humanistic theoretical orientation. I believe that supervision is co-created by the supervisor and supervisee and work with my supervisees to create an egalitarian relationship that encourages mutual feedback as well as openness to differing opinions and approaches. Within the context of supervision I strive to promote growth, openness to new challenges, learning, and very importantly self-care.

Bio:

I have been very fortunate to have found a career that I enjoy so much and that feeds my passion for learning and sharing with others. I am constantly in awe of the things I learn from trainees, clients, and coworkers. In my spare time, I particularly enjoy reading, relaxing with family and friends, and exercise. I find that a good sense of humor and an openness to new experiences has served me well, and I try to incorporate them both into my life as much as possible, with particular attention paid to laughing and joking. Whenever possible I like to travel and really enjoy experiencing new environments and seeing new cultures.

 

Angela Soth McNett, Ph.D., University of Missouri

Groups Coordinator

Theoretical Orientation:

I use an integrated approach comprised of Interpersonal, Person-Centered, and Feminist orientations within a Multicultural framework. Guided by the grounding tenets of these theories, I believe a strong and safe therapeutic relationship is the central vehicle for client healing and change. This alliance serves as a secure base from which to explore clients’ presenting concerns, emotional learning, repertoire of coping strategies, and interpersonal functioning. In particular, I believe it is important to examine how a client’s current behavior and relational patterns may have emerged from early significant relationships. I use interpersonal and experiential interventions to facilitate reparative, corrective emotional experiences in the “here and now” to assist clients in creating new, adaptive understandings of themselves and the world. Given client (and therapist) identities are formed and embedded in multiple levels of experiences and contexts, my conceptualization of the specific interpersonal experiences a client needs to change are guided by his or her personal developmental history, cultural worldview, readiness to change, and strengths. Accordingly I aim to be flexible in my work, and also use Emotion Focused Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Precision Cognitive Therapy, and Art Therapy interventions to meet the needs of the client-in-context. Overall, I passionately believe in the importance of clients gaining a validated, positive identity which bestows meaning and nourishes both psychological security and cultural salience.

Clinical Areas:

I consider myself a generalist and enjoy working with a wide range of client issues and concerns. My specific areas of interest and expertise include women’s issues, eating disorders and body image, family of origin difficulties, relational concerns, personality disorders, and multicultural issues. I also have a passion for couples counseling and group therapy, especially interpersonal process groups. I find the unique microcosm of a group to be a highly productive interpersonal “learning lab” for personal and relational growth. On the whole, I enjoy clinical work and find the process of forming real, transformative connections with students invigorating.

Supervision Style:

I highly value training and find supervision to be one of the most rewarding aspects of working in a University Counseling Center. I use a collaborative, developmental approach which focuses on identifying and reinforcing supervisees’ current strengths, while also integrating new skills and refining existing ones. Similar to my therapeutic approach, I believe the crux of successful supervision occurs in the context of a genuine, warm, and trusting relationship. I find such interpersonal safety promotes supervisees’ willingness to explore challenging issues and experiment with new clinical interventions and conceptual frameworks. I ask supervisees to be invested in their growth as a therapist, as well as to engage in self-reflection and self-evaluation. Common growth areas I tend to focus on in supervision include intentional application of theoretical orientation, deepening affect, and use of self in therapy. In addition, I am happy to discuss professional development issues including research, job search and career choice, career/family balance, and transitioning from a counselor-in-training to a professional psychologist.

Bio:

On a more personal note, I love spending time with my family (including pets!) and friends. Other interests include traveling, reading, theatre, gardening, music, and photography.

2017-2018 Doctoral Interns

  • Brian Bettonville – Southern Illinois University-Carbondale
  • Tricia Kennedy – University of Denver
  • Molly Moore – Auburn University
  • Marussia Role – Wright Institute

2016-2017 Doctoral Interns

  • Leslie DeLong – University of Kansas
  • John Jurica – Colorado State University
  • Rachel Ploskonka – Purdue University
  • Tiffany Williams – Cleveland State University

2015 – 2016 Doctoral Interns

  • John DeBerry, New Mexico State University
  • Kerry Karaffa, Oklahoma State University
  • Troy Moles, University of North Texas
  • Josh Turchan, Auburn University

2014 – 2015 Doctoral Interns

  • Allison Asarch, Roosevelt University
  • Jeremy Bissram, SUNY-Albany
  • Kimberly Conde, Wright State University
  • Krista Garrett, University of North Texas

2013 – 2014 Doctoral Interns

  • Courtney Clippert, Auburn University
  • Marilyn Cornish, Iowa State University
  • Kristin Miserocchi, University of Kentucky
  • Kerri Schafer, University of Nevada-Las Vegas

2012 – 2013 Doctoral Interns

  • Ashley Cooper, Our Lady of the Lake University
  • Robbie Culp, Argosy University Chicago
  • Tina D. Hoffman, , University of Iowa
  • Petra J. McGuire, Texas Tech University

2011 – 2012 Doctoral Interns

  • Andrew Armstrong, Utah State University
  • Doriane Besson, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Kristin Frevert, University of Denver
  • Ryon McDermott, University of Houston

2010 – 2011 Doctoral Interns

  • Steve Caloudas, University of Houston
  • Kelly Liao, Iowa State University
  • Cara Miller, Gallaudet University
  • Amber Olson, University of Denver

2009 – 2010 Doctoral Interns

  • Becca Hansen, Ball State University
  • Kasi Howard, Texas Tech University
  • Andrea Goldschmidt, Washington University, St. Louis
  • David Tager, University of Missouri

2008 – 2009 Doctoral Interns

  • Amy Collins, Texas A&M
  • Dave Dayton, Brigham Young University
  • Tim Gordon, Ball State University
  • Lisa Lorenzen, Tennessee State University